Tag Archives: slideshare

Digital Trends 2013

In digital agencies we often work in uncharted territory and therefore spend much time thinking about the big question “What’s Next?”. Where and how do we spend our future creative efforts? For the benefit of brands, clients and agencies alike, we better get that one right. Read up on these three reports: Razorfish’s Outlook, Reactive’s Perspectives and VJ-Isobar’s FYI – and make the right calls for the future.

My agency Reactive‘s Perspectives ( free PDF download Slideshare version ) covers topics like ‘Who really owns your social content?‘, ‘The Personalisation of Everything‘ and ‘How to create great work‘.

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On our Facebook page we accompany these articles with some shareable graphs – extra points scored by using Venn diagrams.

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creepydatapersonalisation

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SXSW outcome: Need more BIG TYPE presentations!

Have you noticed some of the SXSW “highlights” working their way through services like slideshare, 12seconds or dodgeball foursquare? I myself wouldn’t mind attending the “rock out with your geek out” fest in Austin someday. But when I do, I hope I don’t have to sit through a presentation like this one:

It was highlighted in slideshare’s newsletter as a must read presentation – I call this BIG TYPE drivel (unless Little Media Brian and his personal delivery was absolutely on fire that day). Of course nobody needs to be a designer or typographer in order to write a presentation. Still, when the only times BIG TYPE gets broken up is when meaningful bits are set in bold to make you consider their deep and interconnected meaning I get the shivers. May I suggest playing preso ever-green Right Here to underscore the heftiness of these statements?

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April Fool’s Rockstars: Slideshare taps into our Twitter Vanity

Last night, I was quite surprised to receive a message from Slideshare , informing me that one of my uploaded presentations had racked up more than 100,000 views. As much as I want to believe my professional musings and slides rock the world of advertising, I instantly felt something was fishy but couldn’t resist clicking on the link.

The original email read:

Hi tbuesing,
We’ve noticed that your slideshow on SlideShare has been getting a LOT of views in the last 24 hours. Great job … you must be doing something right. 😉
Why don’t you tweet or blog this? Use the hashtag #bestofslideshare so we can track the conversation.
Congratulations,
-SlideShare Team

Slideshare RockStar, Twitter God, Social Media Buddha (image by Zen)

Slideshare RockStar, Twitter God, Social Media Buddha (image by Zen)

Sure enough, anyone can be a Rockstar of Powerpoint on April Fool’s Day.  The #bestofslideshare search on Twitter revealed that many had taken enough time to  “get it” (the joke).  Some others stepped straight into the vanity trap and blasted their unexpected fame into the Twittersphere (and still do as I write this). It is a bit like watching people slip on a banana,  me, snickering at poor dudes trying to act modest, yet beaming with pride that their “recent trip to Serbia and Montenegro” or “Home Networking 101” had received this gigantic audience boost. But it reveals two basic truths we all know about our social publishing habits.

  1. we do all of this mostly to get attention and kudos, we want to be “Social RockStars” (in our niches)
  2. our cycle of receiving, processing and publishing information has increased to such a pace where some people skip the processing part and just publish

Slideshare has by now received a lot of negative feedback,  Jonathan Boutelle, one of the founders of Slideshare felt obliged to do a Kowtow on his Twitter stream, reading:

“#bestofslideshare Big “sorry, I f*d up” to our wonderful SlideShare community! We love you guys, and we weren’t trying to embarrass anyone.”

In my opinion, the criticism comes from people who have lost their sense of humour somewhere along the race for becoming the umpteenth “social media evangelist”.  What’s your verdict?