Tag Archives: amnesia

Near future communication at Mojo

“Swipe, tap and eat” –  a little update from the Creative Technology front at MOJO. We have partnered with Amnesia/Razorfish and the University of Sydney to develop a mobile application that could change the way we order our favourite meals. We helped MA student Stephen Davis to devise, test and program ‘BrandTable’. It is concept that allows shoppers to order food with only a tap of their mobile phone, using near-field-communication (NFC). A popular smartphone feature in Japan and Korea, NFC will sweep into the Australian market in 2012. Our video of the prototype, which you can see here, has already caught the attention of global technology blogs TechCrunch and Engadget.
We know Australians love smartphones and social networking, so we will continue to explore this technology. Any progressive creative idea, from mobile couponing, real-time scavenger hunts to launching branded films, can be propelled by NFC. And that makes it very near-future-communication for us at MOJO.
Advertisements

Get involved with Creative Social Sydney

We interviewed our speakers Louise and Richard before Tuesday’s get together at MOJO / Amnesia Razorfish and here’s the video of the night, a bit rough around the edges.

Here are also a few snapshots taken during the two talks.

Creative Social at MOJO / Amnesia Razorfish

Creative Social at MOJO / Amnesia Razorfish

Both speakers are keen to take their projects further, so if you are intrigued by their work, identify with their projects and feel like you could contribute, please do get in touch via their respective sites:

Louise Hawson’s 52 Suburbs
Louise is planning to get ’52 Cities’ underway soon, and you would guess she is not talking about 52 cities within Australia. So as per Ben Cooper‘s suggestion, you might see her project gain traction on Kickstarter soon.

Richard Vevers Underwater Sydney
Richard’s project is getting major digital support from BMF through our Creative Social member Aaron Michie. But BMF building a new site won’t be enough, so if you are an agency willing to donate time and expertise in whatever field of communication, please get in touch. The underwater sea life literally needs more visibility.

The next Creative Social takes place at The Hallway, hosted by Jules Hall and Jamie Corker, speaker still to be announced.

Creative Social featuring ’52 Suburbs’ and ‘Underwater Sydney’

I am really excited about tonight’s Creative Social (more on CS below), this time hosted by Amnesia Razorfish and myself here at MOJO. We have the pleasure of welcoming two speakers, both ex-advertising professionals, who explore our home town Sydney in very artistic and unusual ways.

Creative Social at MOJO invite

Creative Social at MOJO invite

Louise Hawson is the author of popular blog 52 Suburbs, a search for beauty in Sydney’s more than 600 suburbs. Her work consist mainly of photo diptychs, taken in documentary style over the course of (you guessed it) one year. The body of work is now being turned into a book (to be released in May as part of Sydney Writers Festival) and an exhibition (to be opened at Museum of Sydney May 14) . Have a peek at the list of suburbs and see if yours has been explored by her.

52 Suburbs at redfern

52 Suburbs at Redfern by Louise Hawson

Our second speaker is Richard Vevers who is a member of Underwater Sydney, a conservation effort for Sydney’s beautiful underwater coastline. He will speak about his passion for diving and underwater photography – and how it took him to get involved in this noble cause.

Nudibranch by Richard Vevers

Nudibranch by Richard Vevers

Creative Social Sydney is a monthly get together of digital CDs and senior thinkers in the industry. We get involved in advising industry bodies such as IAB or ADMA, think about how to get greater and more innovative work out there, have the voice of digital creativity be heard more often, and invite inspirational speakers. Originally started in London by Mark Chalmers and Daniele Fiandaca who will be present tonight as he is in town with HyperIsland. It is now happening in numerous cities around the globe, and the lucky ones even get to travel around and have coffee in other fantastic cities (not us sadly).

http://vimeo.com/10675509

Facebook mythbusting by SOAP

This SOAP presentation is currently going gangbusters on Slideshare and deservedly so. All points are valid and true, my favourites are 2, 4 and 9. Actually, I regret not having written something like this earlier, as our hands-on experiences are very similar to theirs. Oh, and on the same day Amnesia have posted a story from their P&O cruise ship facebook page. It is unusual to see such a steady stream of posts, continuous threads of comments and obvious community feel to a group of facebook fans.

Reminds me to share. more. knowledge.

Stop the Pre! Do the Post! The moderation issue in social media campaigns

This post continues my glance at NAB’s opportunity drawings. Coming from tonight’s Creative Showcase presentation I took home a good dose of moderation-mantra: Stop the Pre! Do the Post! Move your online campaigning from pre- to post-moderation. Amnesia’s Iain McDonald presented Smirnoff Experience’s Secret Party campaign which proves the value of guiding rather than controlling a campaign from within a social network (in this instance a facebook group).

the blog

the blog

Potential party goers went into the group with an expectation of instant interactivity, free commenting and constant replies, and were served accordingly by the brand and their peers. GPS gaming, videos and social interactions were all tightly interwoven. All the while, users were behaving responsibly, and dealing with eachother in appropriate ways. Successful ticket hunters were proudly showing off their trophies and one example of self moderation included the online crowd petitioning ebay to take down (unfair?) party ticket auctions.

showing off the tickets

showing off the tickets

To me the evidence is clear that offering a social group interesting stuff always needs a post moderation approach (of comments, posts, interactions) to be successful. It is something we have approached similarly on Toohey’s For The Love Of Beer campaign.

can has scribble

can has scribble

I reckon it is something that instinctively everyone (even a lawyer) knows: write something, see your own post, respond to banter, pass it on… all of this relies on instant gratification to be rewarding and keep momentum. Users see it happen and work beautifully on most of the web, on a daily basis and especially in social networks. So they don’t tolerate legal bottlenecks and content wormholes. Who would seriously and continuously bother if every contribution goes into moderation first?