Tag Archives: Video

Splendour in the Grass and on YouTube

This Sunday afternoon from 4pm onwards Splendour in The Grass will be running as a free live stream in the masthead on YouTube’s homepage as well as on Virgin Mobile’s channel. This is a first for paid media in our region so everyone here at Mojo is properly chuffed about getting this up.

YouTube masthead with Splendour in the Grass

YouTube masthead with Splendour in the Grass

Many people here including our partner agencies and Google have been working hard to make this happen. If you do live in the right region please enjoy the free stream of a pretty good line up consisting of Coldplay, Kaiser Chiefs, Cloud Control, Elbow, Vaccines and The Vines.

Even better, if you happen to be mucking around at Splendour itself, or know someone that is and/or have a Twitter or Instagram account, please participate with the hashtags #splendour, #splendourlive or #SITG . All tweets will be picked up and displayed underneath the videostream. And some of the Instagram shots might end up in The Vaccines new crowdsourced music video.

Splendour Live Stream Party

Splendour Live Stream Party

There are also live streaming parties running in Sydney, Perth and Melbourne this Sunday, so come on down to the Beach Road Hotel in Bondi or the Bimbo DeLuxe in Fitzroy from 4pm on Sunday and enjoy the festival atmosphere without the mud!

Give The Boxer some love

Entries for Good Work on YouTube have closed and soon the jury under guidance from Craig Davis will pick a winning entry. I am quite chuffed that my colleague Henry Hall (with the help of some other lovely people here at Mojo) has entered his video. It is called ‘The Boxer‘ and was conceived and produced as a response to a brief from SOS – Casas de Acolhida. The Brazilian organisation works for the protection of children aged 0 – 6 from domestic violence.

Being a dad myself this stuff cuts pretty close to the bone, so please give the film some love by liking it here.

B is for Bruce, V is for Volume

In mid 2000, so almost 11 years ago, I and two other creatives in Germany got invited to create a digital art work for the exhibition Berlin – HongKong. We contributed the most logical thing: an ‘ultra-interactive KungFu Remixer’. We called it “I know where Bruce Lee lives” (a nod to the TV Personalities‘ lyrics of ‘I know where Syd Barrett lives‘).

I know where Bruce Lee lives - by SKOP

I know where Bruce Lee lives - by SKOP

It essentially was a very early mash-up piece, using snippets of Bruce Lee films (animations, fight sounds and loops of the score by genius Lalo Schifrin). Particularly entertaining for us was the hammy gangster dialogue snatched from the German dubbing of said martial arts films. Sprinkled into the mash-up were Chinese characters that mimic some of the sounds you hear. In order to get these right we had asked a Chinese language professor for help – to this day I have no idea what they really mean (see a trailer for the app here).

I know where Bruce Lee lives - by SKOP

I know where Bruce Lee lives - by SKOP

The playful interactivity comes through using your keyboard to ‘make music’ with Kung Fu. There is a longer list of the international festivals and exhibitions (from the US, Brazil, Spain and Holland to Hongkong and Australia) it was part of.

To this day ‘I know where Bruce Lee lives‘ ranks among the top Google search hits for the Asian hero. I still receive emails of people discovering and liking it, among them many martial arts fans but also musicians such as Krautrock-god Holger Czukay of CAN fame. The latest feedback email came through last week, from one of the members of ‘V for Volume‘. They are apparently a very popular Chilean band, coincidentally sporting some half-German members in their line up.

It is kind of hard to see the Bruce Lee connection in this video, maybe I should brush up on my Spanglish. But despite this, it never ceases to amaze me how the internet connects us in different ways at different times with our various tastes and aesthetic sensibilities. Double Rainbow all the way.

3 Things I learnt from doing video interviews

It’s been a while but I am still amused and inspired by my meeting with Casey Spooner at Melbourne Festival. During a hectic but very enjoyable “brand immersion day” with Beck’s I was able to meet Casey back stage. The camera work is a bit wobbly and Casey had a funny way of rambling and theorizing. Still, I was lucky to get a lot of shots during their performance without getting pulled by the bouncers. Practically half the audience was recording with mobile phones and cameras at any given point (makes clapping your hands after a song difficult).

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This interview was the first for Beck’s Uberselektor with Alex Barck from my (student day) heroes Jazzanova. Alex and his crew have sonified many of my Thursday nights at the WMF in Berlin. It was clerarly a rubbish idea to only bring the camera and no separate microphone (I think we didn’t even have one at the time).

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Roland Appel is from equally good pedigree in terms of electronic music, creating some memorable tracks under the names of Truby Trio and Fauna Flash. He is easily as friendly, approachable and professional as Alexander and a pleasure to interview. Both interviews were done at Future Classic’s studio/office space in Redfern.

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Top things I learnt doing these interviews:

People like to ramble.
The more to the point your question, the better they get in coming to the point. Although, Germans love to over-explain and analyse. The more energy you put into your questions and into the exchange, the more energy you will get out of your interviewees. Use open questions like “Take me through this experience”. Don’t hesitate to redo a question if the people lost their train of thought – the second time they will feel more comfortable with the topic and have a more polished version.

You cannot ignore bad sound
Unless you go beserk with the camera people will tolerate a bad zoom or pan in an online video. Bad sound cannot be ignored, especially on the computer where the output device is weak in the first place and mostly played in a noisy environment. Headphones and earplugs might help but you cannot bank on people having them ready or care enough to plug them in. Watch out for background sounds that interfere with the voices.

Edit your own shit
Unless you start editing you never fully understand what you have missed filming and what you can do better next time. Shoot the extra scene of your interviewee getting ready, heading out or something else that can serve as a “cut away” scene. Nobody enjoys a talking head for more than 20 seconds online. Underscore visually what the people are talking about.

The Best of Slap Chop: You are going to love my nuts

I am so late on Slap Chop but this very annoying infomercial got what it deserved, it got slapped and chopped. Even massacred. The Slap Chop wave of remixes, edits and spoofs has amassed millions of combined views and this would definitely be my favourite (please hang in there till about 1:15).

Having just seen ABC’s Laurence Leung meet and greet his teen hero ‘Shabba-Doo‘ from Breakin (and Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo) made the Slap Chop Mashup even better. But if you are more the wordy type, don’t miss the dub by Jabo0odyDubs

And if yo gringos want to hear The Vince himself slaughter (or better slap chop) the Spanish language, por favor:

YouTube Live – 90 minutes of web celebrities

YouTube’s first foray into live entertainment just “aired” and these are a couple of my first impressions and observations (in no particular order).

YouTube Live vloggers/hosts

YouTube Live vloggers/hosts

  1. When you glue together web celebs (or ‘webreblities’ as they seem to be called) it makes for a fairly entertaining format – lots of B-boying and body popping though. I either leaned back during the guests I knew or browsed in parallel for the reference videos of guests I hadn’t seen before.
  2. YouTube avoided Yahoo!s bandwidth choke a month ago and the streaming in high quality went smoothly.
  3. YouTube did a good job in selling themselves as the credible platform for becoming a star out of nowhere. Either through starring, experimenting, mimicking, spoofing, playing the background track to something strange, etc … OK, everybody knew that already but seeing a whole 90 minutes of web-born stars must have given some kids another motivational boost.
  4. When you take some acts out of their living room, you realize they aren’t that interesting, vocally gifted or funny.
  5. Is “Choccolate Rain'”s Tay Zonday the voice of generation V ?
  6. Some of the backstage/offstage footage was a real challenge to watch and definitely took a bit of the fascination out of it. Nothing new for people who have been to TV-recorded gigs. It goes to show that directing 90 minutes of live entertainment with three simultaneous feeds poses the same logistical challenges it did before the interweb.
  7. Nice integration of a live stream from aboard Virgin America, on a plane on its way to the show.
  8. A modern audience seems to be so busy with recording events via mobile phone, they don’t clap or wave their arms anymore. Given that Flip Mino was a main sponsor it was a fitting sight. I couldn’t find links to any ‘audience videos’ that were supposedly uploaded during the event. Reminds me of BeastieBoys’ I Shot That.
  9. Most importantly, there was no interactivity with the web audience that i could see. The usual channel comments or any sort of live stats did not have any influence on the show. There were no live overlays directing users to additional footage/info. I am sure a space YouTube will expand their format into.
YouTube Live VJaying by

YouTube Live VJaying by Mike Relm

The whole show format definitely beat any Australian live show that is on regular TV. If you have seen a re-broadcast or excerpts what are your first thoughts?

Additions:
JaffeJuice commented on the integration of sponsors, appointment viewing,  catch up in byte-sized clips and most important of all the potential of future interactivity (e.g. integration of live commenting with services like 12seconds.tv).

And this is…like…a YouTube Live response of guest Daxflame …that is … like awesome and uh…he met sooo many friends. And stuff.

Hm, guess this parody is too close to real teenager speak for me.